Monday, 26 July 2010

Mathew Lowry and the European online public sphere

Martin on Europaeum launched the Twitter hash tag #bkaeb for Better Know A EuroBlog, for blog posts giving reasons for reading a specific Euroblog.



Mathew Lowry’s Tagsmanian Devil has been mentioned frequently on Grahnlaw, because Mathew has spent a lot of time and effort thinking aloud about the European online public space.

Please, take the time to read a number of older blog entries to get acquainted with the state of the Eurosphere.

In this #bkaeb post I am going to refer to the two latest posts only.



Mathew presents his starting points on group blogs, ethics and group inertia, inspired by the long but important blog post where Bora Zivkovic says farewell to Scienceblogs.



Mathew’s latest post Bloggingportal2: What, Why, How … and When? acknowledges that Bloggingportal.eu (BP) helps people find out what people are saying about the EU in social media.

However, according to Mathew, more is desirable and possible:


Human curation is essential to overcome the barriers of language and national political contexts. And that curation is what BP’s model offers.

So I would want to see BP remain focused, laserlike, on this aim. It doesn’t need to become an intranet for bloggers, or (another) blogging platform, or (another) group blog. People should blog wherever they like, with BloggingPortal doing better what it already does.




He then discusses the need for resources, curated policy sections and finding the necessary funds for development, before he invites ideas from readers.

By reading Mathew’s entries, you do not only get to know one Euroblog, but the state of the Euroblogosphere.



Mathew is the engine for SWOT analysis in the European online public sphere: Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats.

Please, join the conversation.




Ralf Grahn



P.S. Multilingual comment policy: In order to facilitate interaction in the Euroblogosphere, I do my best to read comments in Danish, Dutch, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Spanish or Swedish, even if the Grahnlaw blog and my possible replies are in English.